Press

Lungs

Sarah performs in the Pittsburgh premiere of the two-person play by Duncan MacMillan.

“Not once was my attention anywhere else…I was riveted because of the extraordinary performances of Sarah Silk and Alec Silberblatt…Silk and Silberblatt burst onto the stage and for an hour-and-a-half burn their way through this play with a style and intelligence that I’m sure has left scars. My hat is lifted to some brilliant, brilliant work.”

– Ted Hoover, Pgh City Paper Read more…

“You can’t help but fall in love with “Lungs” from the start, especially the woman – kooky, cute, but not overly so…spinning emotional conflict out of playwright Duncan Macmillan’s torrent of words…I’d go again just to see the two actors work.”

– Chris Rawson, Pgh Post Gazette Read more…

“Silberblatt and Silk are superb beyond description as the man and woman. These may, in fact, be two of the finest performances I’ve seen in Pittsburgh this year…Silk and Silberblatt bring the relationship between the man and woman into crystal clear focus and flesh out their characters’ needs and vulnerabilities with empathy, sensitivity, and wit.”

– The Pgh Tatler Read more…

“I wouldn’t be lying if I said that Sarah Silk is almost too good at the neurotic, eventually heartbroken female lead in Lungs. Silk’s ability to show sorrow mixed with longing and love with an occasionally dose of humor keeps the audience hanging on for more…Lungs asks more out of its female performer and Silk responds by giving us our very own modern Madam Bovary.”

– Pgh in the Round Read more…

“Silk gets the lengthier monologues which she renders flawlessly despite the rapid fire and often contradictory thoughts and feelings she ruminates over and expresses to her other half. She criss-crosses her way through a maze of logic, facts, feeling and thoughts to create a certain theatrical pointillism, each dot of her narrative eventually coalescing to form a three-dimensional identity.”

– Pgh Owl Scribe Read more…

The Flick

Sarah plays Rose in the Pittsburgh premiere of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize winner by Annie Baker.

“Silk is fabulous as Rose, playing her with a vivacious insouciance that feels both studied and careless: Rose is a gal who’s always a little “on,” but Silk is firmly in the hypernaturalistic performance style of the play even as she plays with and “performs” for Sam and Avery.”

– The Pgh Tatler. Read more…

“…a perfectly chosen cast…Sarah Silk packs this powerhouse with energy sizzling off the stage. Her Rose is a sympathetic enigma.”

– Pgh City Paper. Read more…

“Sarah Silk with the wonderful green hair…The acting was tremendous. Really truthful performances by all three of the actors…There’s a moment where Avery says something really heavy, and Sarah takes her time to like, she has this reaction, and it takes a long time to get through to her, I guess, or she doesn’t know what to say next. Which I thought was really nice, cause too often in plays character know exactly what they’re gonna say…I thought she really nailed that ‘I don’t care’ attitude….I know people like this… it was very real….”

– Burgh Vivant. Read more…

“…one of my favorite new plays…The whole cast does a wonderful job…Each character has moments where you love them and moments where you hate them….The same goes for Sarah Silk playing Rose…She has the “confident cool girl” vibe from the minute she enters the theater…Her confidence masks her insecurities that don’t come out too often, and her relationships with her male coworkers constructs a really interesting triangle…In the argument that maybe theater is dying or is just for old people, I would not hesitate to bring up ‘The Flick.’”

– Pgh in the Round. Read more…

“Of the three actors, Ms. Silk is the most winning.”

– Chris Rawson, Pgh Post Gazette. Read more…

Scared of Sarah

In the new play by Laura Brienza, Sarah plays an Autistic woman (named Sarah).

“One of the three characters has autism, but she’s not “the autistic” as much as she’s a character with autism along with her other dimensions. I have to say that Sarah Silk’s performance as Sarah was the best of the evening; a lot of physical work and an excellent portrayal without falling into caricature.”

– WWVB Blog. Read more…

“Sarah was played immaculately. I felt myself echoing her anxious stims. I saw myself in what hurt and the way she moved…I had meltdowns like the ones Sarah had on stage when I was younger. I was affected by my brother’s death in a very similar way to Sarah’s experience of her father’s death…”

– Blog by an autistic viewer. Read more…

“Performances that’ll knock your socks off…the takeaway is the work of this outrageously good cast…Cuenca, Silk and Hall play with ruthless honesty, and it yields devastating results.”

– Ted Hoover, Pgh City Paper. Read more…

“Impactful, powerful…wow, wow, wow…Sarah’s portrayal of Sarah was very authentic. It gave you a really touching feeling of what it must be like to be in a family that has to deal with a challenge…Sarah Silk’s performance was stunning and very believable…Sarah, who frustrates the audience so often also manages to endear herself to the them…compelling strong performance.”

– Burgh Vivant. Read more…

“Her inevitable on-stage ‘meltdown’ was horrifying to behold because Silk had drawn us in to the many capabilities and strengths of Sarah as a character…the rich complexity of this character…Silk absolutely shined performing a role that was very physical and filled with nuance.”

– Pgh Lesbian Correspondents. Read more…

“Director Ingrid Sonnichsen challenges Silk to reach dramatic brilliance…Her tantrums are simultaneously bone chilling and heart wrenching…Silk brings Sarah’s character to life in ways that not only frighten Lily, but conjure awe from the audience.”

– Megan Grabovsky, Pgh in the Round. Read more…

Ghosts

In the classic play by Henrik Ibsen, Sarah performs with Off The Wall Theater in Pgh, PA.

“Sarah Silk particularly shines as Regina, a young maid who is subject to the whims of just about everyone around her. Silk takes the little agency Regina is granted and makes it resonate, exuding the hope, naiveté and skepticism of a life lived in subservience..”

– Tyler Plosia, Pgh City Paper. Read more…

“Silk does a marvelous job playing Regina, a woman determined to guide her own fate…”

– Brian Edward, Burgh Vivant. Read more…

Parlour Song

Sarah performed in the play Parlour Song by Jez Butterworth with the innovative Quantum Theatre in Pittsburgh. Sarah was named one of the best actresses of the year by the Pittsburgh Post Gazette for her performance. And the show received great reviews.

“Let's point out Sarah Silk for sure, because she was very – she made interesting choices, really good choices, because you don't wanna like her, but you like her, and you kinda see, even though she's doing something you think is not – it's a little naughty, a little bit bad…”

– Michael Buzzelli, Burgh Vivant. Watch the full review…

“The acting captures the intensity of ordinary yet profound dilemmas. Each of the three actors carries equal weight, creating a dynamic in the room that makes the simple script profound: …and Silk’s stunning, emotionally charged performance of a woman trapped in her own life, searching for a way out. There are moments when we feel as if we’re inside the minds of all three characters. Even if everything that has happened isn’t fully understood, we feel fully immersed in their world.”

– Sarah Moss-Horwitz, the Tartan. Read more…


The Vultures

Sarah Silk as Blanche in The Vultures

Blanche, The VulturesPhoto by FIAF.

Sarah performed in a staged reading of 19th century French writer Henri Becque's The Vultures. The reading was performed as part of the Crossing the Line Festival at the Alliance Francaise. It was directed by Jim Simpson and had an all-star cast including Kathleen Turner, Bebe Neuwirth, Gerry Bammon, and more. See the details and full cast list here:

http://www.fiaf.org/events/fall2007/2007-10-01-the-vultures.shtml


…Double Vision

Sarah Silk as Michelle in ... Double Vision

Michelle, … Double VisionPhoto by Jim Baldassare.

Read reviews from another play of Sarah's Double Vision. It was performed in the 2007 FringeNYC Festival. After a sold-out run, the show was invited for a second run in the Fringe Encore Series. Double Vision was rated four stars by Time Out Magazine.

“All the actors in this production deliver noteworthy performances, but special mention goes to Sarah Silk in the smaller, supporting role of Michelle, Ben's French girlfriend. As the young soubrette in love with an older man, Silk embodies all the qualities of a young girl foolishly in love for the first time. She beams as Ben pontificates about love and life, and their loud, orgasmic lovemaking to Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture is only fitting for the uninhibited and newly in love. Silk also carries off Michelle’s accent with natural aplomb.”

– William S. Gooch at NewYorkCool.com. Read more…

“Another stand-out is Sarah Silk as Michelle, the 21 year old French lover of 50 year old Ben (Christopher McCann). Though she is not long on stage, her final diatribe at Ben is a gem…”

– Joy Keaton, Speak the Speech, I Pray You blog. Read more…


The Bats in the New York Times

Mark Blankenship wrote an article entitled “Hard Work, No Pay, Stiff Competition” in the November 11, 2007 edition of the New York Times describing the Bats at the Flea Theater. Read more:

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/11/theater/11blank.html


Offending the Audience

Sarah performed in Offending the Audience at the Flea Theater, a subversive classic written by Austrian writer Peter Handke. It was directed by Jim Simpson, Obie-winning artistic director of the Flea Theater, and featured 21 of the Flea's resident acting ensemble the Bats.

“Here's my question for the long line of young performers who take turns blowing the minds of any square from the 1960s who just arrived downtown from a time machine: Why are you so adorable?”

– Jason Zinoman, The New York Times. Read more…

“…Offending the Audience may be the liveliest downtown piece you'll see this year.”

– Gwen Orel, Backstage. Read more…

“…a great demonstration of the range and versatility of both the Flea Theatre and its resident acting company”

– Jenny Sandman, Curtainup. Read more…